TAP Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Toolkit Implementation Guide now available

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The Targeted Assessment for Prevention (TAP) strategy is a method developed by the CDC to use data for action to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The TAP strategy is a way to identify facilities or units within a facility with the highest excess numbers of infections, so that prevention efforts may be directed towards facilities or units in greatest need of improvement.

The TAP Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Toolkit Implementation Guide: Links to Example Resources is now available. The guide is a compilation of links to existing CAUTI prevention tools and resources that can be used as part of the TAP strategy. CDC would like to acknowledge a multitude of organizations for the resources that are featured in this guide.

As a reminder, the TAP report function is available in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) application. The TAP report function allows NHSN users to identify facilities (within a conferred rights group [PDF – 1.27 MB]) or units with excess numbers of infections compared to a predicted number based on the HHS Standardized Infection Ratio (SIR) targets for CAUTI, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). This information can help staff know where assistance with prevention of HAIs is needed most.

View the TAP CAUTI guide: TAP Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Toolkit Implementation Guide

Learn more: Targeted Assessment for Prevention (TAP) Strategy

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